Swims

 
 

MY CURRENT GOAL - TRIPLE CROWN OF OPEN WATER SWIMMING

 

The World Open Water Swimming Association presents the Triple Crown of Open Water Swimming to those with authenticated completion of three famous marathon swims; the English Channel between England and France, the Catalina Channel in Southern California USA, and around Manhattan Island in New York USA. I swam the English Channel on 8 July 2014 (11 hours, 22 minutes), the Catalina Channel USA on 19 July 2017 ( 11 hours , 18 minutes) and will swim Manhattan Island on 8 September 2018. After that I will do the remaining five marathon swims for the Oceans Seven starting with the North Channel between Ireland and Scotland on 19 August  2019.


My next swim:

THE 20 BRIDGES SWIM / 8 SEPTEMBER 2018

Manhattan

MANHATTAN ISLAND

The 20 Bridges Swim around Manhattan Island, which is a distance of 45km (28mi) is significant because it makes up the third leg of the World Triple Crown (English Channel, Catalina Channel, Manhattan Island). The swim only runs three or four times per year with just 12 swimmers per event. This is a long swim but when swum well the last part is tide assisted.


MY CATALINA CHANNEL SWIM / 19 JULY 2017

catalina .jpg

CATALINA CHANNEL

This is the channel between Santa Catalina Island and Los Angeles, California, USA. 32.3km (21 mi). 15 - 16C. First swum in January 1927, less than 500 successful soloists have made the swim since then. A particular challenge of this swim is that it is swum at night to avoid the blustery winds that dog the route through the day. I completed the Catalina Channel swim in 11 hours 18 minutes, on the night of 19 July 2017 with pilot Dave Harvey on board the Pacific Jewel with my support crew.

"CCSF congratulates Michael Teys, of Sydney, Australia, who was victorious in the Catalina Channel this morning when he completed his solo swim in the unofficial time of 11:18:20. Sea conditions, overall, were good, but Michael was challenged by a strong current that pushed him down the channel, and he ended up landing at “Gracie’s Point” where Grace van der Byl completed her record setting solo in 2012. And yes, some rock climbing was required!

Michael is a protégé of Vlad Mravec’s Vladswim program for marathon swimmers, whose swimmers come well trained to take on the channel. He swam the English Channel in 2014, and plans to round out his Triple Crown with a swim around Manhattan Island. Support crew member and fellow English Channel swimmer, Cae Tolman, is on his way to Manhattan to swim in the 20 Bridges event. CCSF President, Forrest Nelson, observed the swim with Mark Miller.

Great swim and effort, Michael! We look forward to congratulating you on achieving your Triple Crown!"


MY ENGLISH CHANNEL SWIM / 8 July 2014

ENGLISH CHANNEL

The English Channel between England and France is the busiest waterway in the world and at its narrowest point is 34km (21mi). I completed this swim on 8 July 2014 in 11 hours and 22 minutes and was the 112th Australian to complete the swim. Made possible by pilot Peter Reed aboard Rowena FE75 alongside my handler James Goins, my sister Jacqui Bartholomeusz, David Bartholomeusz as medical support, and on video Gaetan Guilhon.


ROTTNEST CHANNEL 2013/2014

ROTTNEST CHANNEL

Rottnest Channel is highly regarded world wide and Australia's premier marathon swim, the Rottnest Channel is 19.7km open water swim from Cottesloe Beach to Rottnest Island. It is held in February of each year; I completed the swim in 2013 in a time of 7 hours, 6 minutes and returned a year later to swim a personal best time of 6 hours, 22 minutes. Completing this swim is a traditional path for Australian swimmers heading for the English Channel.


AHEAD - THE OCEAN'S SEVEN

OCEAN'S SEVEN 

Ocean's Seven consists of seven long distance open water swims, and is considered the marathon swimming equivalent of the Seven Summits mountaineering challenge. It includes the North Channel, the Cook Strait, the Molokai Channel, the English Channel, the Catalina Channel, the Tsugaru Strait and the Strata of Gibraltar. After completing the Triple Crown I will undertake the remaining five, health and finances permitting, at the rate of one per year.

 


North Channel

This is the channel between Ireland and Scotland. It is 33.7km (21mi) across and the water temperature is 12C (54F). The challenge of this route is its infamously difficult weather and water conditions, as well as its large pods of stinging jellyfish.

TSUGARU CHANNEL

This is a deep water channel between Honshu, the main island of Japan where Tokyo is located, Hokkaido, the northern most island of Japan. It is 19.5km (12mi) across which, by marathon swimming standards, is short but swimmers must cross an extremely strong current which will push you back before it will allow you to cross. The most successful course is about 30km. The water temp ranges between 16-20C (62-68F).

MOLOKAI CHANNEL

This is the channel between the Western coast of Molokai Island and the Eastern coast of Oahu in Hawaii. At 41.8km (26mi) it is the longest of the Ocean's 7 with very strong currents and aggressive marine life.

COOK STRAIT

This strait lies between the north and south islands of New Zealand. It is a 26km swim across immense tidal flows in icy water conditions with the added risks of jellyfish and sharks.

STRAIT OF GIBRALTAR

Between Spain and Morocco, the Strait of Gibraltar connects the Atlantic Ocean to the Mediterranean Sea. It is a 14.4km (8mi) swim made more complicated by heavy boat traffic and surface chop. Most attempts are made from Tarifa Island due to the influence of strong currents which is a distance of 18.5km - 22km (10 - 12mi).